Report: Michael Gonzalez leaves Nats for Brewers

Another left-handed reliever is off the market.

Michael Gonzalez, who appeared in 47 games with the Nationals last season, has signed a one-year deal with the Brewers, according to FOXSports.com's Ken Rosenthal.

The deal is worth $2.25 million plus incentives, according to CBSsports.com.

Gonzalez posted a 3.03 ERA with the Nats, and he held left-handed hitters to a .179 batting average. He was also a valuable voice in the Nationals' clubhouse, as he mentored a number of the Nationals' younger pitchers, especially Ross Detwiler, who went to Gonzalez for tips in between starts.

He was an option to return to D.C. next season, but instead chooses to join Tom Gorzelanny in Milwaukee.

After signing both Gonzalez and Gorzelanny within the last eight days, the Brewers have now taken two of the three left-handed relievers the Nationals had on their roster for much of last season. And the Nats' options when it comes to adding another lefty out of the bullpen are starting to shrink.

J.P. Howell remains the Natonals' top choice as a late-inning southpaw, and he's still on the market. There is very little else out there behind Howell, however.

Here are the left-handed relievers still available, according to MLBTradeRumors, with ages in parenthesis: Howell (28), Pedro Feliciano (35), Rich Hill (32), Will Ohman (35), Manny Parra (30), Rafael Perez (31), and J.C. Romero (37).

The Nationals don't necessarily need to add another lefty out of the bullpen; they have Zach Duke as their left-handed long-reliever and Bill Bray is on board after signing a minor league deal.

There are a few right-handers in the Nats' bullpen who have strong numbers against lefties, namely Tyler Clippard (who held lefties to a .170 batting average last season) and Craig Stammen (lefties hit .198 off him in 2012)

But manager Davey Johnson has said that he would prefer to have two lefties in his 'pen come opening day. Bray is a candidate to grab that role as the second southpaw, but the Nationals' options on the open market appear to be dwindling.

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