Nationals agree to terms with pitching coach Jim Hickey

The Washington Nationals agreed to terms with Pitching Coach Jim Hickey on Monday. Nationals President of Baseball Operations and General Manager Mike Rizzo and Manager Dave Martinez made the joint announcement.

Hickey, 58, joins Washington as the pitching coach after spending the last two seasons (2019-20) as a special assistant for player development with the Los Angeles Dodgers. The 2021 season will be Hickey’s 38th season in professional baseball and his 16th as a Major League pitching coach. He served in the role with the Chicago Cubs (2018), Tampa Bay Rays (2007-17) and Houston Astros (2004-06). Hickey coached alongside Dave Martinez in Tampa Bay during Martinez’s time as the Rays’ bench coach (2008-14). Hickey joined Houston’s staff following seven seasons as pitching coach with Triple-A New Orleans and 16 total seasons as a coach in Houston’s Minor League system.

“I am very excited to add Jim to our coaching staff and organization as a whole,” said Nationals Manager Dave Martinez. “He brings a wealth of knowledge, experience and passion to the job. He’s led a lot of really good pitching staffs over the years and has been a part of many successful clubs along the way. He’s helped countless pitchers improve, achieve their full potential and become All-Stars. Jim and I worked together in the past and I am really looking forward to working with him again.”

Hickey has been a part of seven Postseason appearances (2018, 2013, 2011, 2010, 2008, 2005, 2004) and has coached 12 different All-Stars: Alex Colome (2016), Chris Archer (2015), Brad Boxberger (2015), David Price (2010-12, 2014), Matt Moore (2013), Fernando Rodney (2012), James Shields (2011), Rafael Soriano (2010), Scott Kazmir (2008), Roy Oswalt (2005-06), Roger Clemens (2005) and Brad Lidge (2005).

A native of Chicago, Illinois, Hickey pitched in 204 games, going 39-31 with a 3.54 ERA across seven Minor League seasons with the Chicago White Sox (1983-87), Los Angeles Dodgers (1988) and Houston Astros (1989). He was selected in the 13th round of the 1983 First-year Player Draft out of the University of Texas Pan-American. He was a first-team All-American in 1983 and is now a member of the school’s Hall of Fame.